Delicious Simple Red Sauce (Whole30 Compliant)

Friends! I mentioned starting Whole 30 in my last Wellness Wednesday post, then immediately fell off the face of the Earth. The thing is, I didn’t really want to talk a lot about it up front, in case I did a terrible job and stopped committing, like, a week in. Here I am, though- almost through Week 4 and going so strong! Just five more days, and my Whole 30 is complete.

{its like hearing angels singing}

So I’ve successfully committed and I’ve seen some great results- I’ll talk more about those next week. What I want to do today is start to share some recipes that have played a big role in my diet lately. (In case you’re wondering, my Whole 30 strategy was very basic- I counted on about a half a dozen basic recipes, with slight variations, to get me through my first time).

Easiest Red SauceToday’s recipe is my Simple Red Sauce (which I’ve been making for years, well before I was even aware of Whole 30). Italian food is one of my comfort foods, and I really wanted to find a way to integrate parts of what I already love into my program menu. I also knew that if I changed too radically, it would just feel like a temporary diet, and not something sustainable. So this red sauce was really key to keeping my food familiar, interesting, and still really healthy.

This recipe has 4-5 ingredients, so it’s pretty simple (perfect for non-chefs!). When you cook with that few ingredients, you really need to make sure to use the best quality you can find and afford. For that reason, I strongly urge you to find some San Marzano whole tomatoes. They’re about $4 for the can, compared something like $1.60 for store brand, but they seriously make a world of difference in the flavor (I know, because I spent so long saying that it was silly to pay extra when the store brand was probably comparable- it’s not). You can usually find these either by the pasta sauce, or in the international foods aisle.

Easiest red sauce2

A few more common questions- why buy whole tomatoes? Because a cooking instructor once shared that they’re better quality than diced or pureed, because you can see exactly what you’re working with, so now that’s what I do. And it doesn’t really take that long to blend them. And why make your own sauce? Because why not? Seriously, though, most tomato sauces have added sugar and other preservatives and weird things. Whole 30 is all about eating as close to nature as you can, so I like my food to be as unprocessed as possible. Short of using actual, ripe tomatoes, this is as good as it gets for sauce…and its pretty good. Just saying 🙂

Basic Red Sauce

  • ½ sweet yellow onion
  • 2-3 cloves garlic (optional, I guess)
  • Olive oil
  • 28 oz can san marzano tomatoes
  • Kosher salt

Prep: Dice your onion to your specifications- I go between a fine dice and a rough chop, depending on how I’m using my sauce. Mince your garlic finely (or use squeeze garlic- seriously, that’s one place I don’t blame you for cutting corners). Empty the tomatoes into the blender and pulse a few times until you have a consistency that you like.

Sauce: heat 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil in a wide sauce pan. Add the onions and a generous pinch of salt and cook on medium or medium low for about 7 minutes, stirring occassionally. You want to onions to get translucent, and start to take on color very slowly- that’s how they start to caramelize and add amazing flavor to the sauce. After 7 or 8 minutes, add the garlic and continue to cook for another 2 minutes on relatively low heat. Garlic burns easily and then gets bitter, so really pay attention once you add it to the pan. When the garlic starts to soften and get really fragrant, add the tomatoes to the pan and cook on a medium heat for about ten minutes. You can put a lid on the pan to keep excess water from evaporating, or leave the lid off to cook out some of the water for a thicker sauce. As always, add some water to thin if you’d like to change the texture. Salt to taste (I usually add two or three generous pinches of salt) and serve however you’d like.

You’ll see next week that I use this with meatballs over zoodles, in zucchini boats stuffed with ground meat, with grilled stuffed peppers- there are so many options, and this is a delicious base for many Whole 30 meals.

This entry was posted in Food.